The Lang Consultancy | Why women aren’t CEOs
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Why women aren’t CEOs

Why women aren’t CEOs

When women act forcefully, research suggests, men are more likely to react badly. Read about it here. A Lean In/McKinsey & Company survey in 2016 of 132 companies and 34,000 employees found that women who negotiated for promotions were 30 percent more likely than men to be labeled intimidating, bossy or aggressive.

I city girl, I signed up to a self defence course for women decades ago. Apparently women find it hardest to scream and punch, so these were the first things we were taught to do. Reading this excellent article, it seems that we’re still finding it difficult to push ourselves forward. Coupled with a number of other factors including the male game in corporate and political life with rules women are not always privy to, it is no surprise that achieving parity in the C-suite seems a long way away. But try we must. This is not a task for women, but for men and women, working together. It is not addressed in this article, but analyses after analyses demonstrates that a diverse leadership team delivers improved performance for the organisation. So keeping women out of the C-suite may make incumbent men feel better and more secure, but it is irresponsible, and shareholders should ask tough questions to CEOs and management teams.

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